aaus-list @ ukrainianstudies.org -- [aaus-list] A turning point and a missing link: the Battle ofPoltava (two lectures)


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Sunday, October 3, 2 p.m.
Two lectures...

"Poltava 1709: What if History Missed Its Turning Point?"
Lecture (in English) by Prof. Serhii Plokhii, Harvard University


Gustaf Cederström (1845‒1933). Mazepa and Charles XII on the
Dnipro, 1879. Private collection of Fredrik Ekman
Gustaf Cederström (1845‒1933). Mazepa and Charles XII on the Dnipro, 1879.
Private collection of Fredrik Ekman


On the morning of June 27, 1709, two armies faced each other in the fields near the Ukrainian city of Poltava. One was led by the young and ambitious king of Sweden, Charles XII, the other by the not so young but no less ambitious tsar of Muscovy, Peter I. The ensuing battle has been widely regarded as a turning point in European history. Peter won, turning the tide of the long Northern War. Charles lost and had to seek refuge on the territory of the Ottoman Empire. At the end of the war Peter proclaimed himself emperor of Russia, and his country became a major European power. In time, Russia not only put an end to Swedish dominance in the Baltic region and Northern Europe but also embarked on an aggressive course of westward expansion that took its troops all the way to Paris during the Napoleonic Wars of the next century. Would you like to know what would have happened if Charles, and not Peter, had emerged victorious at Poltava? Serhii Plokhii will provide answers to this and many other related questions.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

"God's Grace, Which Liberated Ukraine and Ukrainian Literature After (and Before) the Battle of Poltava: The Missing Link"
Lecture (in English) by Prof. George Grabowicz, Harvard University


Mykola Ivasiuk (1865-1930?). Bohdan Khmelnytsky Entering Kyiv, 1912
Mykola Ivasiuk (1865-1930?). Bohdan Khmelnytsky Entering Kyiv, 1912
NAMU collection; not on exhibit

Prof. Grabowicz will examine the first major -- if indirect -- response to the defeat of Ukrainian aspirations at the Battle of Poltava (1709) in a dramatic work (God's Grace, Which Liberated Ukraine, 1728), which postulates an entirely new paradigm for viewing Ukraine's past and future. That paradigm, in fact, will come to define modern Ukrainian national consciousness -- but the work itself remains obscure to this day (hence "the missing link").

Q&A and reception follow after the second lecture.

The Ukrainian Museum
222 East Sixth Street
(between 2nd & 3rd Avenues)
New York, New York 10003
Tel: 212.228.0110

Tickets:(for both lectures): $15; $10 members and seniors; $5 students
http://www.ukrainianmuseum.org/shop/display.php?cat=26


--
Less is more, more or less.
- Mies van der Rohe

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